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#211298 - 06/05/13 12:19 AM Name the writer or the book.
jenny jenny Offline
veteran

Registered: 06/05/10
Posts: 1305
Loc: Lower Aberdeen, Mississippi
“The Bedouin owed no taxes, paid no landlord, recognized no borders. The Arabian peninsula from which he sprang, had remained remote and beyond the grasp of the conquests of Egypt and Rome. In the punishing desert a cruel culture evolved that matched the brutal dictates of nature. While the world of progress passed him by, the Bedouins survived largely by plundering the vulnerable. Strong sheiks with no more compassion than the blistering sun showed little mercy to the weak. The Bedouin was thief, assassin, and raider, and hard labor was immoral.”

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#211301 - 06/05/13 07:05 AM Re: Name the writer or the book. [Re: jenny jenny]
Faldage Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 12/01/00
Posts: 13783
"I against my brother, my brothers and I against my cousins, then my cousins and I against strangers"

Or, as the Berbers say, "Tomorrow there will be apricots."

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#211302 - 06/05/13 09:40 AM Re: Name the writer or the book. [Re: Faldage]
tsuwm Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 04/03/00
Posts: 10508
Loc: this too shall pass
Is the answer simply to exclude both Uris and Keegstra from freedom of expression’s protection? Keegstra makes racist claims that play on the fears and prejudices of some members of the community. Uris’s narrative builds on ethnic and religious stereotypes, which may be assimilated by the reader without conscious, or at least careful, consideration. The line-drawing problem, however, is not resolved by redrawing the line in another place. The problem is much deeper than the unclear distinction between what Keegstra says and what Uris writes. Madame Justice McLachlin has not simply chosen a bad example with The Haj. Racial and other stereotypes are so deeply entrenched in our culture, our language, and our thinking that it is impossible to isolate clearly the offensive claims of Keegstra and the offensive stereotyping of Uris from ordinary public discourse. A wide range of expression, both extreme and ordinary, conveys racist attitudes and contributes to the spread or reinforcement of racist opinion in the community. This is the real line-drawing problem. It is much deeper than Madame Justice McLachlin supposes.

-Richard Moon

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#211308 - 06/05/13 06:31 PM Re: Name the writer or the book. [Re: tsuwm]
olly Offline
old hand

Registered: 12/18/06
Posts: 953
Loc: Auckland, New Zealand
Good point.
Never let the facts get in the way of a good story eh!

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#211310 - 06/05/13 09:29 PM Name the writer or the book. [Re: olly]
jenny jenny Offline
veteran

Registered: 06/05/10
Posts: 1305
Loc: Lower Aberdeen, Mississippi
"It was late and everyone had left the cafe except an old man
who sat in the shadow the leaves of the tree made against the
electric light. In the daytime the street was dusty, but at
night the dew settled the dust and the old man liked to sit
late because he was deaf and now at night it was quiet and he
felt the difference. The two waiters inside the cafe knew that
the old man was a little drunk, and while he was a good
client they knew that if he became too drunk he would leave
without paying, so they kept watch on him."

Hmm. I thought this would be a easy one. Notice the effortless cluster of "d" words in this the opening paragraph. Like him or not the man was an artist.



Edited by jenny jenny (06/07/13 12:38 AM)
Edit Reason: to give a hint

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#211325 - 06/07/13 06:08 PM you won'f recognize this, but you can easily find [Re: jenny jenny]
tsuwm Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 04/03/00
Posts: 10508
Loc: this too shall pass
To live long enough to be in the right place at the right time to make one's fortune. Yes, yes, hard work and talent make up the difference. They are crucial, and you know I'd never argue different. But the foundation of all lives is luck. Good or bad. Luck is life and life is luck. And it's leaking from the moment it lands in your hand.

edit: oh yeah, the previous was obviously Papa.. and so?


Edited by tsuwm (06/07/13 06:11 PM)

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#211326 - 06/07/13 06:52 PM Re: you won'f recognize this, but you can easily find [Re: tsuwm]
jenny jenny Offline
veteran

Registered: 06/05/10
Posts: 1305
Loc: Lower Aberdeen, Mississippi
The idea, tsuwm, was to post a paragraph or two by writers who could be identified by their distinctive style or unique content. What would be the fun in googling them up?

I googled your excerpt up. The writer was Dennis Lehane. I didn't have fun.

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#211327 - 06/07/13 07:03 PM Re: you won'f recognize this, but you can easily find [Re: jenny jenny]
tsuwm Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 04/03/00
Posts: 10508
Loc: this too shall pass
it wasn't meant to be fun, it was meant to introduce something different.

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#211328 - 06/07/13 08:54 PM Re: you won'f recognize this, but you can easily find [Re: tsuwm]
jenny jenny Offline
veteran

Registered: 06/05/10
Posts: 1305
Loc: Lower Aberdeen, Mississippi
Oh! Now I see.
You are right tsuwm, as I re-read his paragraph I too find Lehane's thoughts somewhat worthwhile and different.
Sorry.


Ok, who wrote this... (a translation)

By contrast, today, when the herd animal in Europe is the only one who attains and distributes honours, when “equality of rights” all too easily can get turned around into equality of wrongs— what I mean is into a common war against everything rare, strange, privileged, the higher men, the higher souls, the higher duty, the higher responsibility, the creative fullness of power and mastery—these days the sense of being noble, of willing to be for oneself, of being able to be different, of standing alone and of having to live by one’s own initiative—these are part of the idea “greatness,” and the philosopher will reveal something of his own ideal if he proposes “The man who is to be great is the one who can be the most solitary, the most hidden, the most deviant, the man beyond good and evil, lord of his virtues, a man lavishly endowed with will—this is precisely what greatness is to be called: it is able to be as much a totality as something multi-faceted, as wide as it is full.” And to ask the question again: today—is greatness possible?







Edited by jenny jenny (06/07/13 09:20 PM)
Edit Reason: to add new excerpt

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#211330 - 06/08/13 12:55 AM Re: you won'f recognize this, but you can easily find [Re: jenny jenny]
tsuwm Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 04/03/00
Posts: 10508
Loc: this too shall pass
"the man beyond good and evil" is kind of a give-away for this one.

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