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#199116 - 04/14/11 08:57 AM Linguistic therapy
Candy Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 09/21/10
Posts: 1705
Loc: down under


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#199123 - 04/14/11 11:10 AM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: Candy]
LukeJavan8 Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 06/23/08
Posts: 6580
Loc: Land of the Flat Water
Those little grammar things can really gnaw at a person.
_________________________
----please, draw me a sheep----

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#199127 - 04/14/11 04:08 PM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: Candy]
obihave Offline
newbie

Registered: 03/25/11
Posts: 39
Loc: Oregon
For some people the dictionary is a remedy for insomnia. For others...it's a page turner.

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#199129 - 04/14/11 06:54 PM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: obihave]
LukeJavan8 Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 06/23/08
Posts: 6580
Loc: Land of the Flat Water
Just a reference for me......or a door stop.
_________________________
----please, draw me a sheep----

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#199132 - 04/14/11 08:39 PM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: obihave]
olly Offline
old hand

Registered: 12/18/06
Posts: 956
Loc: Auckland, New Zealand
For others...it's a page turner.
And for others its a click.

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#199134 - 04/14/11 08:53 PM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: olly]
LukeJavan8 Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 06/23/08
Posts: 6580
Loc: Land of the Flat Water
I'll stick with page turner.......
_________________________
----please, draw me a sheep----

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#199147 - 04/15/11 07:11 AM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: Candy]
Faldage Offline
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Registered: 12/01/00
Posts: 13803
Back when I was a kid, you put me down with a dictionary and I'd have forgotten the word I was looking up by the time I'd made it through the dozen byways I'd gotten off on before finding the word I was looking for.

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#199148 - 04/15/11 07:31 AM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: Faldage]
Avy Offline
old hand

Registered: 06/23/00
Posts: 724
I have individual relationships with my various dictionaries. A Marathi to English - I hate - it never helps. So many words I have not found in it. A big urdu(nastaliq) to English I like but it is an effort since my nastaliq is not too good and the dictionary is huge. I have a teeny tiny Urdu (devanagri) to English which I love! It never fails me. It seems written for poetry. Any difficult urdu word in a poem I will find in this dictionary even though it is just 3"x 3". My English-sanksrit is like a wise old man. It is there for me when I need it, which is not that often.

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#199165 - 04/15/11 11:13 AM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: Avy]
LukeJavan8 Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 06/23/08
Posts: 6580
Loc: Land of the Flat Water
I really envy you that many languages. It has to be so
refreshing.
_________________________
----please, draw me a sheep----

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#199167 - 04/15/11 11:21 AM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: Avy]
tsuwm Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 04/03/00
Posts: 10523
Loc: this too shall pass
one problem I have with researching obscure words is that I have just too many dictionaries to search through in attempting to find them - and too often none of them are helpful. (this situation often leads directly to one of my "mystery word" posts.)

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#199169 - 04/15/11 11:43 AM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: Faldage]
LukeJavan8 Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 06/23/08
Posts: 6580
Loc: Land of the Flat Water
Originally Posted By: Faldage
Back when I was a kid, you put me down with a dictionary and I'd have forgotten the word I was looking up by the time I'd made it through the dozen byways I'd gotten off on before finding the word I was looking for.



I still do this, but don't find it a problem, enjoy the
diversions.
_________________________
----please, draw me a sheep----

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#199261 - 04/21/11 01:54 AM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: LukeJavan8]
Candy Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 09/21/10
Posts: 1705
Loc: down under
makes me wonder.....

100 words for

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#199262 - 04/21/11 04:19 AM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: Avy]
BranShea Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 06/23/06
Posts: 5282
Loc: Netherlands, the Hague
Avy, it must be nice to understand those old languages. Dictionaries to me are like cars, I just only care for the function.

Quote:
makes me wonder..... 100 words for smile

I'm reading Arctic Dreams by Barry Lopez. Will get back on the subject when I'll have time. (Jackie !! THE book for hot summer days!)


Edited by BranShea (04/21/11 04:25 AM)

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#199263 - 04/21/11 06:08 AM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: Candy]
Faldage Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 12/01/00
Posts: 13803
Originally Posted By: Candy
makes me wonder.....

100 words for




Heh

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#199264 - 04/21/11 07:35 AM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: BranShea]
Avy Offline
old hand

Registered: 06/23/00
Posts: 724
In India, to learn the local language everytime you shift states is a necessity. I know only 3 languages well. All the rest are functional.

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#199265 - 04/21/11 08:04 AM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: Avy]
goofy Offline
member

Registered: 01/06/08
Posts: 132
Originally Posted By: Avy
I know only 3 languages well.


Marathi, Urdu, and English?

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#199268 - 04/21/11 10:30 AM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: goofy]
Avy Offline
old hand

Registered: 06/23/00
Posts: 724
Marathi, Hindi, and English. The functional languages I know are Kannada, Tamil and now Konkani (still learning). Urdu is the language I love. I am not very good at it. I am constantly looking up the Urdu dictionary because I read a lot of Urdu poetry. I know this line up sounds impressive, but all Indians are bi,tri,quadri lingual.

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#199274 - 04/21/11 01:12 PM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: Avy]
LukeJavan8 Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 06/23/08
Posts: 6580
Loc: Land of the Flat Water
I'm impressed! ! !
_________________________
----please, draw me a sheep----

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#199275 - 04/21/11 01:13 PM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: Candy]
LukeJavan8 Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 06/23/08
Posts: 6580
Loc: Land of the Flat Water
Originally Posted By: Candy
makes me wonder.....

100 words for




Yuk,yuk
_________________________
----please, draw me a sheep----

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#199277 - 04/21/11 03:35 PM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: Avy]
goofy Offline
member

Registered: 01/06/08
Posts: 132
Originally Posted By: Avy
Marathi, Hindi, and English. The functional languages I know are Kannada, Tamil and now Konkani (still learning). Urdu is the language I love. I am not very good at it. I am constantly looking up the Urdu dictionary because I read a lot of Urdu poetry. I know this line up sounds impressive, but all Indians are bi,tri,quadri lingual.


My understanding is that on a basic conversational level, Urdu and Hindi are pretty much the same. When you get into specialized registers, the vocabulary is different. And of course the scripts are different.

I know some Hindi, and a little amount of Sanskrit and Tamil.

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#199282 - 04/21/11 09:00 PM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: BranShea]
Candy Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 09/21/10
Posts: 1705
Loc: down under
Originally Posted By: BranShea

I'm reading Arctic Dreams by Barry Lopez. Will get back on the subject when I'll have time.


Yeah, just the thing for 'Summer reading'.....does it have photos?
(I have a friend who was 'ships doctor' on trip to Antarctica, and he took some amazing photos of that continent and wildlife). I would love to go to either pole, just to experience the same!

To Avy, goofy, Bran and all you others who have knowledge of several languages cool

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#199283 - 04/21/11 09:09 PM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: Candy]
Candy Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 09/21/10
Posts: 1705
Loc: down under
.....as this is the 'comic relief' thread laugh
I'm posting this here (I was looking for thread were we were discussing knots but I cant find it now!

R 18 (only look if you are broad minded)

Click to reveal..
An old retired sailor, puts on his old uniform and heads for the docks once
more, for old times sake.
He engages a prostitute and takes her up to a room.
He's soon going at it as well as he can for a guy his age, but needing some
reassurance, he asks, 'How am I doing??
The prostitute replies, 'Well, Pops, you're doing about three knots.
Three knots? he asks. What's that supposed to mean?
She says, 'You're knot hard, you're knot in, and you're knot getting your
money back.

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#199296 - 04/22/11 11:27 AM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: Candy]
LukeJavan8 Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 06/23/08
Posts: 6580
Loc: Land of the Flat Water
Good for you Candy. Some should get a laugh, I did.
_________________________
----please, draw me a sheep----

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#199339 - 04/24/11 07:05 AM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: LukeJavan8]
Candy Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 09/21/10
Posts: 1705
Loc: down under
you're going to love this wofa smirk


schrodinger comic

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#199343 - 04/24/11 08:02 AM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: Candy]
Faldage Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 12/01/00
Posts: 13803
Originally Posted By: Candy
you're going to love this wofa smirk


schrodinger comic


404 - Not Found

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#199344 - 04/24/11 08:51 AM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: Faldage]
Candy Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 09/21/10
Posts: 1705
Loc: down under
oh, well then here it is......



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#199346 - 04/24/11 09:16 AM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: Candy]
tsuwm Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 04/03/00
Posts: 10523
Loc: this too shall pass
I guess the link is dead or not dead. (not dead for me..)

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#199350 - 04/24/11 10:56 AM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: Candy]
LukeJavan8 Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 06/23/08
Posts: 6580
Loc: Land of the Flat Water
You are getting into it.
_________________________
----please, draw me a sheep----

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#199352 - 04/24/11 11:59 AM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: Candy]
goofy Offline
member

Registered: 01/06/08
Posts: 132

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#199356 - 04/24/11 02:12 PM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: Candy]
Buffalo Shrdlu Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 06/24/02
Posts: 7210
Loc: Vermont
heh
_________________________
formerly known as etaoin...

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#199377 - 04/25/11 06:05 AM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: Candy]
BranShea Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 06/23/06
Posts: 5282
Loc: Netherlands, the Hague
Thanks @Candy. What I liked to share is this: (from Arctic Dreams)

"We know more about the rings of Saturn than we know about the narwhal. The Chilean poet and essayist Pablo Neruda wonders in his memoirs how an animal this large can have remained so obscure and uncelebrated. It's name, he thought, was "the most beautiful of undersea names, the name of a sea chalice that sings, the name of a crystal spur." Why, he wondered, had no one taken Narwhal for a last name, or built "a beautiful Narwhal Building?"

Part of the answer lies with the regrettable connotation of death in the animal's name. The pallid color of the narwhal's skin has been likened to that of a drowned human corpse, and it is widely thought that it's name came from the Old Norse for "corps" and "whale, " nár + hvalr. But W.P. Lehman, a professor of Germanic languages, believes the association with death is a linguistic accident. The Old Norse nárhvalr ( whence the English narwhal, the French narval, the German Narwal, etc.), he says, was a vernacular play on the word--- the way high-bred corn is used in place of hybrid corn, or sparrowgrass is used for asparagus.---
According to Lehman, nahvalr is an earlier, West Norse term meaning a "whale distinguished by a long, narrow projection" ( the tusk). "

I'm no expert to confirm this, but I thought it interesting for sharing (quite a bit of typing work, so time needed) :^)

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#199380 - 04/25/11 06:46 AM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: goofy]
Tromboniator Offline
old hand

Registered: 05/10/10
Posts: 827
Loc: Alaska
That quote from American Heritage Book of English Usage: "A usage such as If I was the only boy in the world may break the rules, but it sounds perfectly natural." is absolutely correct – for someone to whom it sounds perfectly natural. Damn, I always hate it when people generalize.

Peter

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#199381 - 04/25/11 06:53 AM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: Candy]
Faldage Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 12/01/00
Posts: 13803
So, you're saying that narwhal is an eggcorn?

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#199391 - 04/25/11 11:04 AM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: Faldage]
goofy Offline
member

Registered: 01/06/08
Posts: 132
Originally Posted By: Faldage
So, you're saying that narwhal is an eggcorn?


It might be. It would explain the presence of the r in the modern forms when there is no r in the Old Norse word.

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#199397 - 04/25/11 01:07 PM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: Tromboniator]
goofy Offline
member

Registered: 01/06/08
Posts: 132
Originally Posted By: Tromboniator
That quote from American Heritage Book of English Usage: "A usage such as If I was the only boy in the world may break the rules, but it sounds perfectly natural." is absolutely correct – for someone to whom it sounds perfectly natural. Damn, I always hate it when people generalize.


It's confusing advice. I think maybe what they mean is that "if I was" breaks the traditional rule, but it's part of standard written English.


Edited by goofy (04/25/11 01:08 PM)

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#199404 - 04/25/11 05:42 PM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: goofy]
Tromboniator Offline
old hand

Registered: 05/10/10
Posts: 827
Loc: Alaska
Which raises the question: What is standard English? Since it [If I was the only boy…] doesn't sound "perfectly natural" to me, does that mean I don't speak standard English? Is standard English something that nobody really speaks, but it's a sort of average? I won't say it's wrong, but I would never use it, and would mark it for correction if I were [sic] editing a written piece, then probably allow the writer to overrule me, after discussion.

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#199410 - 04/25/11 09:07 PM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: Tromboniator]
goofy Offline
member

Registered: 01/06/08
Posts: 132
Standard English: what it isn't

I think standard English is the variety of English normally used in writing by writers of English. This means it contains a lot of variety.

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#199414 - 04/25/11 10:13 PM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: goofy]
LukeJavan8 Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 06/23/08
Posts: 6580
Loc: Land of the Flat Water
There is a lot of variety just on this site.
_________________________
----please, draw me a sheep----

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#199420 - 04/26/11 02:05 AM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: Tromboniator]
Candy Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 09/21/10
Posts: 1705
Loc: down under
Originally Posted By: Tromboniator
....If I was the only boy in the world ......


and I was the only girl!

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#199434 - 04/26/11 01:33 PM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: Candy]
LukeJavan8 Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 06/23/08
Posts: 6580
Loc: Land of the Flat Water
And.......?
_________________________
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#199440 - 04/26/11 03:25 PM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: LukeJavan8]
BranShea Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 06/23/06
Posts: 5282
Loc: Netherlands, the Hague
A song Luke, a song.

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#199442 - 04/26/11 04:36 PM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: BranShea]
LukeJavan8 Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 06/23/08
Posts: 6580
Loc: Land of the Flat Water
AAAAHH, I should have guessed.
_________________________
----please, draw me a sheep----

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#199639 - 05/05/11 12:14 AM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: LukeJavan8]
Candy Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 09/21/10
Posts: 1705
Loc: down under
Does the name Pavlov ring a bell?

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#199642 - 05/05/11 02:30 AM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: Candy]
Tromboniator Offline
old hand

Registered: 05/10/10
Posts: 827
Loc: Alaska
Of course! Because I'm actually…Sally Vaiting.

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#199654 - 05/05/11 11:13 AM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: Tromboniator]
LukeJavan8 Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 06/23/08
Posts: 6580
Loc: Land of the Flat Water
Poor Pavlov.
_________________________
----please, draw me a sheep----

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#199676 - 05/06/11 09:59 AM Re: Linguistic therapy [Re: Tromboniator]
Candy Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 09/21/10
Posts: 1705
Loc: down under
Originally Posted By: Tromboniator
Of course! Because I'm actually…Sally Vaiting.


smile

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#199876 - 05/16/11 08:27 AM Whats your business name! [Re: Candy]
Candy Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 09/21/10
Posts: 1705
Loc: down under
You know what its like on Wall Street, business are taken over or merge all the time and have to be renamed......sometimes with humours results: laugh


Hale Business Systems, Mary Kay Cosmetics, Fuller Brush, and W.R. Grace Company merge to become Hale Mary Fuller Grace.

Polygram Records, Warner Brothers, and Keebler Crackers merge to become Polly-Warner-Cracker.

3M and Goodyear merge to become MMMGood.

John Deere and Abitibi-Price merge to become Deere Abi.

Zippo Manufacturing, Audi Motors, Dofasco, and Dakota Mining merge to become Zip Audi Do Da.

Honeywell, Imasco, and Home Oil merge to become Honey I'm Home.

Denison Mines, and Alliance and Metal Mining merge to become Mine All Mine.

Federal Express and UPS merge to become FED UP.

Xerox and Wurlitzer will merge and begin manufacturingreproductive organs.

Fairchild Electronics and Honeywell Computers will merge and become Fairwell Honeychild.

3M, J.C. Penney and the Canadian Opera Company will merge and become 3 Penney Opera.

Knott's Berry Farm & National Organization of Women will merge and become Knott NOW!

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#199880 - 05/16/11 12:00 PM Re: Whats your business name! [Re: Candy]
LukeJavan8 Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 06/23/08
Posts: 6580
Loc: Land of the Flat Water
Adding to your 'sally vaiting', I see. These are clever.
_________________________
----please, draw me a sheep----

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#199894 - 05/17/11 07:17 AM Re: Whats your business name! [Re: LukeJavan8]
Candy Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 09/21/10
Posts: 1705
Loc: down under
Not my 'original thoughts' I just found them somewhere.....but I thought them well worded.

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#199902 - 05/17/11 11:48 AM Re: Whats your business name! [Re: Candy]
LukeJavan8 Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 06/23/08
Posts: 6580
Loc: Land of the Flat Water
Originally Posted By: Candy
Not my 'original thoughts' I just found them somewhere.....but I thought them well worded.



I sent them to one friend who said "SCROAN" - It's her
word for Screech and Groan. Loved it, she meant.
_________________________
----please, draw me a sheep----

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#200662 - 06/23/11 07:57 AM Singing the Blues [Re: LukeJavan8]
Candy Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 09/21/10
Posts: 1705
Loc: down under
Thanks Luke....its good to hear words are spreading.


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#201262 - 07/20/11 06:01 AM Know your phobia's [Re: Candy]
Candy Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 09/21/10
Posts: 1705
Loc: down under
Just a quick quiz.....either check answers yourself or I can mark your reply for you smirk

1. The obsessive fear of tight, enclosed spaces is called:
A. agoraphobia
B. acrophobia
C. claustrophobia
D. klaustrophobia

2. The obsessive fear of open public places is called:
A. agoraphobia
B. acrophobia
C. klaustrophobia
D. xenophobia

3. The obsessive fear of foreigners is called:
A. acrophobia
B. xenophobia
C. agoraphobia
D. claustrophobia

4. The obsessive fear of high places is called:
A. agoraphobia
B. claustrophobia
C. hippophobia
D. acrophobia

5. The obsessive fear of the French is called:
A. Hellenophobia
B. Gallophobia
C. Francephobia
D. Frenchyphobia

6. The medical name for rabies is:
A. homophobia
B. hypophobia
C. hyperphobia
D. hydrophobia

7. The obsessive fear of Greeks is called:
A. Hellenophobia
B. Grekophobia
C. Athenophobia
D. Greekophobia

8. The obsessive fear of animals is called:
A. hippophobia
B. animophobia
C. xylophobia
D. zoophobia

9. The obsessive fear of deep water is called:
A. dipsophobia
B. acrophobia
C. bathyphobia
D. hydrophobia

10. The obsessive fear of horses is called:
A. equinophobia
B. hippophobia
C. bovinophobia
D. orsophobia

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#201265 - 07/20/11 07:12 AM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: Candy]
Faldage Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 12/01/00
Posts: 13803
Originally Posted By: Candy
Just a quick quiz.....either check answers yourself or I can mark your reply for you smirk

1. The obsessive fear of tight, enclosed spaces is called:
A. agoraphobia
B. acrophobia
C. claustrophobia
D. klaustrophobia

2. The obsessive fear of open public places is called:
A. agoraphobia
B. acrophobia
C. klaustrophobia
D. xenophobia

3. The obsessive fear of foreigners is called:
A. acrophobia
B. xenophobia
C. agoraphobia
D. claustrophobia

4. The obsessive fear of high places is called:
A. agoraphobia
B. claustrophobia
C. hippophobia
D. acrophobia

5. The obsessive fear of the French is called:
A. Hellenophobia
B. Gallophobia
C. Francephobia
D. Frenchyphobia

6. The medical name for rabies is:
A. homophobia
B. hypophobia
C. hyperphobia
D. hydrophobia

7. The obsessive fear of Greeks is called:
A. Hellenophobia
B. Grekophobia
C. Athenophobia
D. Greekophobia

8. The obsessive fear of animals is called:
A. hippophobia
B. animophobia
C. xylophobia
D. zoophobia

9. The obsessive fear of deep water is called:
A. dipsophobia
B. acrophobia
C. bathyphobia
D. hydrophobia

10. The obsessive fear of horses is called:
A. equinophobia
B. hippophobia
C. bovinophobia
D. orsophobia


My answers checked in white. Mouse over to see.

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#201267 - 07/20/11 10:28 AM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: Faldage]
BranShea Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 06/23/06
Posts: 5282
Loc: Netherlands, the Hague
bathophobia. My friend Phoebus says so.

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#201274 - 07/20/11 11:02 AM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: BranShea]
LukeJavan8 Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 06/23/08
Posts: 6580
Loc: Land of the Flat Water
I remember that list of phobias somewhere on this sight
or was it WOTD? Baffling.
_________________________
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#201280 - 07/21/11 06:59 AM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: LukeJavan8]
bexter Offline
addict

Registered: 11/17/10
Posts: 677
Loc: Middle Earth
hehe and my personal favourite phobia name

arachibutyrophobia

and guesses as to what it is a phobia of? laugh
_________________________
----The next sentence is true. The previous sentence is false----

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#201282 - 07/21/11 07:50 AM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: Faldage]
Candy Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 09/21/10
Posts: 1705
Loc: down under
Originally Posted By: Faldage
[quote=Candy]....
My answers checked in white. Mouse over to see.


Well done Faldo 100%, but then thats to be expected.


re-arachibutyrophobia, Bex...I don't know....something to do with arches and butter.....maybe walking through butter with bare feet?

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#201294 - 07/21/11 12:06 PM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: Candy]
Buffalo Shrdlu Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 06/24/02
Posts: 7210
Loc: Vermont
arachibutyrophobia = fear of flaming spiders?

:¬ )
_________________________
formerly known as etaoin...

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#201302 - 07/21/11 09:10 PM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: Candy]
Jackie Offline

Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 03/15/00
Posts: 11609
Loc: Louisville, Kentucky
Fear of spiders eating peanut butter? wink

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#201304 - 07/22/11 04:31 AM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: bexter]
BranShea Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 06/23/06
Posts: 5282
Loc: Netherlands, the Hague
Fear of treatment for schizophrenia by immersions in arachide oil. ????

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#201312 - 07/22/11 09:55 AM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: BranShea]
LukeJavan8 Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 06/23/08
Posts: 6580
Loc: Land of the Flat Water
Eeeuuuuuu! ! !
_________________________
----please, draw me a sheep----

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#201328 - 07/23/11 04:45 AM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: LukeJavan8]
bexter Offline
addict

Registered: 11/17/10
Posts: 677
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haha you are sorta close wink but not


arachibutyrophobia is the fear of peanut butter sticking to the roof of your mouth

nothing to do with spiders I am afraid...hehe
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#201335 - 07/23/11 11:36 AM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: bexter]
LukeJavan8 Offline
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Considering how many meals I make of Peanut Butter, it is
a good thing that is not one of my phobias.
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#201352 - 07/24/11 05:14 PM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: LukeJavan8]
bexter Offline
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haha yes indeedy!
My all time favourite sandwich

roast chicken and peanut butter

mmmm laugh
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#201354 - 07/24/11 07:22 PM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: bexter]
LukeJavan8 Offline
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I'll have to give that a try: new one to me.
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#201358 - 07/24/11 10:12 PM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: LukeJavan8]
Tromboniator Offline
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How about pb and banana?

Sandwich.


Edited by Tromboniator (07/24/11 10:12 PM)
Edit Reason: Clarification

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#201359 - 07/24/11 10:47 PM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: Candy]
Jackie Offline

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Oh, no--no, no, no. We will NOT have another thread about sandwiches! Been there, done that, and it was awful.

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#201360 - 07/25/11 12:41 AM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: Jackie]
Tromboniator Offline
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Sorry, Jackie; musta been before my time, huh? Or have I been (heh, heh) loafing?

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#201363 - 07/25/11 10:45 AM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: Jackie]
BranShea Offline
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Originally Posted By: Jackie
Oh, no--no, no, no. We will NOT have another thread about sandwiches! Been there, done that, and it was awful.
mmm...salads?

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#201364 - 07/25/11 11:15 AM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: Tromboniator]
LukeJavan8 Offline
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Originally Posted By: Tromboniator
How about pb and banana?

Sandwich.




Heard about that all my life, have never done that. But have a
friend who makes PB and dill pickles.
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#201365 - 07/25/11 11:17 AM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: Jackie]
LukeJavan8 Offline
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Originally Posted By: Jackie
Oh, no--no, no, no. We will NOT have another thread about sandwiches! Been there, done that, and it was awful.


Sorry Jackie, as Trom says, it must have been before my time too.
and you know how things go, cycles. The discussion was about
phobias and the word for the fear of PB stuck on your palate
before it evolved/regressed.
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#201368 - 07/25/11 01:16 PM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: LukeJavan8]
bexter Offline
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hehe before myn too wink
to drag it back on topic...any guesses as to what

Cibophobia
is a phobia of?
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#201369 - 07/25/11 03:46 PM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: bexter]
Tromboniator Offline
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Fear of sandwiches? of digressions?

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#201370 - 07/25/11 04:11 PM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: bexter]
tsuwm Offline
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well, cibus is L. for food..

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#201377 - 07/26/11 09:02 AM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: Candy]
Candy Offline
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I wish I'd learnt Latin. I think you must be correct Ts.... Cibophobia might be the fear of food!

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#201380 - 07/26/11 11:35 AM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: Candy]
LukeJavan8 Offline
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Because "cibus" is food (from my Latin days), I'd say
something related to food, but being a fear, is it related
to fear of food? Like Anorexia? Some sort of food-related
disorder.

I confess, because honesty is important, that I looked it up
in my dictionary, but it is not there. (It is not on the
scroll down list, that is.) And that is as far as I looked
and had it been I would not post.


http://www.thefreedictionary.com/phobia


Edited by LukeJavan8 (07/26/11 11:57 AM)
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#201385 - 07/26/11 06:11 PM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: Candy]
tsuwm Offline
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Originally Posted By: Candy
I wish I'd learnt Latin. I think you must be correct Ts.... Cibophobia might be the fear of food!


it should be noted, at this point, that phobia is being too narrowly defined as 'fear', to wit (from AHD4):

2) A strong fear, dislike, or aversion

so cibophobia is more likely defined as :dislike or aversion to food: link

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#201386 - 07/26/11 08:53 PM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: LukeJavan8]
LukeJavan8 Offline
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Originally Posted By: LukeJavan8
Because "cibus" is food (from my Latin days), I'd say
something related to food, but being a fear, is it related
to fear of food? Like Anorexia? Some sort of food-related
disorder.

I confess, because honesty is important, that I looked it up
in my dictionary, but it is not there. (It is not on the
scroll down list, that is.) And that is as far as I looked
and had it been I would not post.


http://www.thefreedictionary.com/phobia
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#201389 - 07/27/11 12:40 AM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: LukeJavan8]
olly Offline
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He doesn't see your posts Luke but point taken.

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#201395 - 07/27/11 10:10 AM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: olly]
LukeJavan8 Offline
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Thanks, Olly, very much.
I did not know how the "ignore" works. Seems like he misses
out on a lot. Must be difficult living that way.
Thanks, again.
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#201402 - 07/27/11 05:10 PM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: olly]
tsuwm Offline
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Originally Posted By: olly
He doesn't see your posts Luke but point taken.


okay, as I've been clued in by Olly (thanx), I see what happened now, and I'd sum it up by saying I didn't see Luke's link (which defined phobia, as did I, although I explained why I did). I really can't see the "point taken", I guess, since I also defined cibophobia with my link, so it's not like I totally mantled him, even though I'd not seen his post.

I'd also posit that the chances of my actually mantling Luke are slim, at best. cool

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#201405 - 07/27/11 06:17 PM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: LukeJavan8]
BranShea Offline
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Cibophobia
is a phobia of?
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ONIONS, a fear of onions, cibus, cipolla, cebolla, in O.H.G.
zwibolla.

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#201445 - 07/30/11 10:42 AM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: BranShea]
bexter Offline
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it's a phobia of food in general smile well done to you translatey people laugh

another one if you want:

Omphalophobia
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#201451 - 07/30/11 11:49 AM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: bexter]
LukeJavan8 Offline
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Just guessing here, from my Latin days: Omphales, Omphalos or
something of the kind was an ancient queen, of Lydia or some
such place. She had a god (Hercules????)serve her while wearing
a dress. So Fear, aversion to cross-dressing?????
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#201454 - 07/30/11 11:58 AM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: LukeJavan8]
BranShea Offline
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Isn't omphalos navel?

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#201455 - 07/30/11 12:04 PM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: BranShea]
tsuwm Offline
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Originally Posted By: BranShea
Isn't omphalos navel?


sure, like in omphaloskepsis

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#201457 - 07/30/11 12:25 PM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: BranShea]
LukeJavan8 Offline
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Originally Posted By: BranShea
Isn't omphalos navel?


Sure, I was just remembering the laugh our class got out of
the story of that queen. But that was many decades ago.
And it is a phobia: so not contemplating one's navel, but
an aversion of some sort. Many people today pierce their
navel, no aversion there, rather attraction.
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#201466 - 07/31/11 08:16 AM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: Candy]
Candy Offline
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I can't see how being omphalophobia would be a problem

....unless they had a lint problem they had to attend to on a regular basis.

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#201471 - 07/31/11 11:39 AM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: Candy]
tsuwm Offline
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excepting the last, these are 'real'.

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#201482 - 07/31/11 04:37 PM FDR said it [Re: tsuwm]
wofahulicodoc Offline
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(...mixing his languages maybe)

"PHOBOPHOBIA - res ipse loquitur" -- "The only thing we have to fear is Fear itself ." In a manner of speaking...


(Does that sound like the germ of a double-dactyl to anyone else?

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#201486 - 07/31/11 08:08 PM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: Candy]
tsuwm Offline
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Originally Posted By: Candy
I can't see how being omphalophobia would be a problem


again, it's probly meant as aversion to, rather than fear of, in this instance.

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#201495 - 08/01/11 10:08 AM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: tsuwm]
Candy Offline
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Originally Posted By: tsuwm


excepting the last, these are 'real'.


Love that cartoon....but I could never catch 'porphyrohobia' purple is my favourite colour.

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#201518 - 08/02/11 07:43 AM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: Candy]
BranShea Offline
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So lots of phobias can be replaced by dislike of.

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#201520 - 08/02/11 07:56 AM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: BranShea]
Candy Offline
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I think the preceding word would have to be....irrational, though Bran.

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#201524 - 08/02/11 10:11 AM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: Candy]
LukeJavan8 Offline
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are you say Irrational Fear or Irrational Aversion?
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#201532 - 08/02/11 02:32 PM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: Candy]
BranShea Offline
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Originally Posted By: Candy
I think the preceding word would have to be....irrational, though Bran.
I will agree with you if you tell me what a rational dislike is. Can likes and dislikes be rational?

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#201547 - 08/03/11 08:34 AM Re: Know your phobia's [Re: Candy]
Candy Offline
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I think so....when you have reason for the aversion.
Like a man who was trapped when a building collapsed...now fears things covering his face!

But now I'm not sure....cause it still might be called 'a phobia'


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#201741 - 08/12/11 07:07 AM A linguistics professor..... [Re: Candy]
Candy Offline
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A linguistics professor was lecturing his class the other day. "In English," he said, "a double negative forms a positive. However, in some languages, such as Russian, a double negative remains a negative. But there isn't a single language, not one, in which a double positive can express a negative."
A voice from the back of the room retorted, "Yeah, right."

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#201742 - 08/12/11 09:25 AM Re: A linguistics professor..... [Re: Candy]
TheFallibleFiend Offline
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Originally Posted By: Candy
"Yeah, right."


Cute.

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#201746 - 08/12/11 10:50 AM Re: A linguistics professor..... [Re: Candy]
LukeJavan8 Offline
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Not too bad!
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#204024 - 01/03/12 07:56 PM New Year 2012 [Re: LukeJavan8]
Candy Offline
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Sometimes its like this for me......



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#204079 - 01/06/12 07:20 AM Re: New Year 2012 [Re: Candy]
Rhubarb Commando Offline
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Count your blessings - for some of us, it's ALWAYS like this! frown
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#204088 - 01/06/12 08:15 PM Re: New Year 2012 [Re: Rhubarb Commando]
Jackie Offline

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I just finished the book Still Alice, about a Harvard professor who has early-onset Alzheimer's (age 50). It's quite terrifying; if I didn't love the friend who encouraged me to look it over, I'd throw it at her. I don't read books like this!

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#204094 - 01/07/12 12:34 AM Re: New Year 2012 [Re: Jackie]
Candy Offline
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Alzheimers is scary, Jackie.....hopefully all we'll get will be common, everyday forgetfulness crazy

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#204098 - 01/07/12 06:07 AM Re: New Year 2012 [Re: Candy]
Tromboniator Offline
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Without any scientific basis for it, I'd like to think that for many of us it's normal to forget a certain percentage, and that the quantity may increase but the percentage may be steady. I don't like the condescending assumption that I forgot something because I'm old: I've always forgotten stuff I should remember, and I've always been good at remembering stuff nobody else does. The latter just may not always be the most practical.

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#204099 - 01/07/12 06:11 AM Re: New Year 2012 [Re: Candy]
Candy Offline
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You are correct Peter...our brain must make room for more information...so it just moves 'stuff' to a place where we forget it. Nothing to do with age.

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#204106 - 01/07/12 05:29 PM Re: New Year 2012 [Re: Candy]
Rhubarb Commando Offline
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I agree. I have read (I can't remember where and am too lazy to LIU!) that we never forget, but that, if we do not access stuff we have remembered, we can't find where it is filed in our brain-storage discs when we want it some tomme later..
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#204129 - 01/09/12 11:30 AM Re: New Year 2012 [Re: Rhubarb Commando]
LukeJavan8 Offline
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A Forgettable Theory
from dan.lewis@gmail.com: "Now I Know:That's half the Battle".

Most of us have had this happen: You have a list of tasks to do and walk around your home or office, intent on accomplishing them. The first one is easy -- empty a garbage can or grab a document. You do it and quickly move onto the next, but when you exit the room, you can't manage to recall what the other tasks were. Try as you might, you mind draws a blank.

But don't blame it on getting older or lack of essential vitamins and nutrients in your diet. There's a much more likely culprit: the doorway you just walked through.

In November of 2011, a team of researchers at the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Indiana, published a study which suggested that entering and exiting rooms can cause our short term memories to fail us. Their theory: our brains take items in our short term memories and stick them into virtual compartments, with different ideas in different areas -- much like a house or office has different rooms. When we cross through doorways in the physical world, our mental world also passes through what psychology professor and head researcher Gabriel Radvansky calls an "event boundary" -- an action which, in his words, "separates episodes of activity and files them away." Basically, when your body leaves the room, your mind leaves that "to do" list behind.

Unfortunately, one simply can't return to the room to pick up this virtual "to do" list. In one of the experiments Radvansky and his team conducted, his test subjects were asked to walk around from room to room only to end up where they began.

The full study, published in the Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, is available.
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#204134 - 01/09/12 10:26 PM Re: New Year 2012 [Re: LukeJavan8]
Jackie Offline

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Wow! That sounds very similar to Somebody's theory (I'll have to find shanks and ask him again) that it is good for the elderly to stay in familiar surroundings because seeing certain things will remind them of tasks they need to get done, such as eating.

I, though, have a different experience from what the Notre Dame people describe: if I physically go or turn back to the area where my previous thought of doing something told me was associated with it, I remember what I'd forgotten. It's not always in a different room, though; but sometimes it is.

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#204144 - 01/10/12 06:03 AM Re: New Year 2012 [Re: Candy]
Candy Offline
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Thats exactly what I do, Jackie and it works instantly every time!

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#204148 - 01/10/12 06:59 AM Re: New Year 2012 [Re: Candy]
Faldage Offline
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So you think of something that needs doing in the kitchen, but you're in the living room. So you go into the kitchen to do it and forget what it was. You go back to the living room and remember, then go back to the kitchen and forget all over? Is that how it works?

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#204175 - 01/10/12 10:48 PM Re: New Year 2012 [Re: Faldage]
Jackie Offline

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More like, say I have finished washing the dishes and realize there was something specific I had planned to do. And I remember that it involved the knife drawer. I look at (not in) the drawer and remember that my plan was to get the scissors out of there so I could then go wrap the birthday gift. I may or may not have walked into another room after finishing the dishes.

And then there are the times such as when we had a refrigerator downstairs in the laundry room. I started downstairs with the thought that I'd put the clothes in the dryer then get a loaf of bread out of the freezer and bring it back upstairs to start thawing. Yep--back upstairs, bread still downstairs in the freezer--which was an arm's length from the dryer.

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#204176 - 01/11/12 11:41 AM Re: New Year 2012 [Re: Jackie]
LukeJavan8 Offline
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Total recall, the ability of someone to remember every word they read or hear, has often been lauded as tantamount to a high level of intelligence. The opposite is more often the case. Those with total recall often have difficulty making decisions, and more readily miss understanding the overall point of a book or lecture - because they get enmeshed in an undistinguishable mass of irrelevant details. Forgetting, it turns out, has enormous value for concise understanding and for emotional health:

"Solomon Shereshevsky could recite entire speeches, word for word, after hearing them once. In minutes, he memorized complex math formulas, passages in foreign languages and tables consisting of 50 numbers or nonsense syllables. The traces of these sequences were so durably etched in his brain that he could reproduce them years later, according to Russian psychologist Alexander R. Luria, who wrote about the man he called, simply, 'S' in The Mind of a Mnemonist.

"But the weight of all the memories, piled up and overlapping in his brain, created crippling confusion. S could not fathom the meaning of a story, because the words got in the way. 'No,' [S] would say. 'This is too much. Each word calls up images; they collide with one another, and the result is chaos. I can't make anything out of this.' When S was asked to make decisions, as chair of a union group, he could not parse the situation as a whole, tripped up as he was on irrelevant details. He made a living performing feats of recollection.

"Yet he desperately wanted to forget. In one futile attempt, he wrote down items he wanted purged from his mind and burned the paper. Although S's efforts to rein in his memory were unusually vigilant, we all need - and often struggle - to forget. "Human memory is pretty good," says cognitive neuro-scientist Benjamin J. Levy of Stanford Univer- sity. "The problem with our memories is not that nothing comes to mind-but that irrelevant stuff comes to mind."

"The act of forgetting crafts and hones data in the brain as if carving a statue from a block of marble. It enables us to make sense of the world by clearing a path to the thoughts that are truly valuable. It also aids emotional recovery. 'You want to forget embarrassing things,' says cognitive neuroscientist Zara Bergstrom of the University of Cambridge. 'Or if you argue with your partner, you want to move on.' In recent years researchers have amassed evidence for our ability to willfully forget. They have sketched out a neural circuit underlying this skill analogous to the one that inhibits impulsive actions.

"The emerging data provide the first scientific support for Sigmund Freud's controversial theory of repression, by which unwanted memories are shoved into the subconscious. The new evidence suggests that the ability to repress is quite useful. Those who cannot do this well tend to let thoughts stick in their mind. They ruminate, which can pave a path to depression. Weak restraints on memory may similarly impede the emotional recovery of trauma victims. Lacking brakes on mental intrusions, individuals with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are also more likely to be among the forgetless (to coin a term). In short, memory - and forgetting - can shape your personality."

Author: Ingrid Wickelgren
Title: "Trying to Forget"
Publisher: Scientific American Mind
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#204180 - 01/11/12 09:55 PM Re: New Year 2012 [Re: LukeJavan8]
Jackie Offline

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...the ability to repress is quite useful. Those who cannot do this well tend to let thoughts stick in their mind. They ruminate, which can pave a path to depression. And/or OCD. I knew someone with this; it took the form of obsession far more than compulsion.

Attention really does affect how well you remember something--or don't. I confess that I tend not to remember things if I think I'm not going to need that information again. I had a really high GPA in college because most of the tests consisted of having to spit back out a ton of force-fed facts; but within a few weeks I'd forget most of them.

I have tried to do better with peoples' names lately. Used to be, if I met someone more or less in passing--"Jackie, this is my cousin Cecelia Jones; she's visiting from Arizona"--I wouldn't remember the name by the time I left the party. blush

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#206774 - 08/22/12 11:20 PM In other words.... [Re: Jackie]
Candy Offline
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#206779 - 08/23/12 06:19 AM Re: In other words.... [Re: Candy]
Rhubarb Commando Offline
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But maybe we should! Txt lang has been cre8d for a reason and is becoming a dynamic entity. I xpct it soon to Bcome a literary medium.

(BTW, I - along with many others - was using B4 as an abrev. way back in 1959!)
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#206780 - 08/23/12 11:42 AM Re: In other words.... [Re: Rhubarb Commando]
LukeJavan8 Offline
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Rhuby since you are so versatile perhaps you could
translate the chalkboard comment for me. I don't speak
text.
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#206782 - 08/23/12 01:07 PM Re: In other words.... [Re: Candy]
Faldage Offline
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Laugh Out Loud
Oh My God
Mind Your Own Business
Because
Too Much Information
With Respect To
Before
By The Way
For What It's Worth
I Am Not A Lawyer
Just Kidding
Later

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#206783 - 08/23/12 01:14 PM Re: In other words.... [Re: Faldage]
LukeJavan8 Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 06/23/08
Posts: 6580
Loc: Land of the Flat Water
thanks, I guess. Think I'll stick to English, not
textspeak, but I appreciate your response.
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#206784 - 08/23/12 02:33 PM Re: In other words.... [Re: LukeJavan8]
Rhubarb Commando Offline
old hand

Registered: 11/13/11
Posts: 1074
Loc: Lancaster, UK
And to bring you even further up to date, it ain't a chalkboard he's using (I've not seen one of those in the past ten years - worse luck!) it's a 'whiteboard', which is a plastic-ish surface that will take dry marker pens, the markings of which rub off the board with a duster. Much the same as a chalk board, really, except they cost twice as much, the markers cost five times more than chalk*, and last for one tenth of the time. This is PROGRESS! Stand in it'sway at your peril.

(Also, you throw a marker pen at a recalcitrant student - and you find you're before the beak on an assault charge!)

[/rant]


edit* By which I mean, 1 marker pen costs five times as much as A PACKET of chalk and lasts one tenth of the time of ONE PIECE of chalk!


Edited by Rhubarb Commando (08/23/12 02:37 PM)
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#206785 - 08/23/12 05:30 PM Re: In other words.... [Re: Candy]
Faldage Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 12/01/00
Posts: 13803
They do clean off better and they can be made to copy what's on them. FWIW.

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#206786 - 08/23/12 05:56 PM Re: In other words.... [Re: Rhubarb Commando]
LukeJavan8 Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 06/23/08
Posts: 6580
Loc: Land of the Flat Water
Originally Posted By: Rhubarb Commando
And to bring you even further up to date, it ain't a chalkboard he's using (I've not seen one of those in the past ten years - worse luck!) it's a 'whiteboard', which is a plastic-ish surface that will take dry marker pens, the markings of which rub off the board with a duster. Much the same as a chalk board, really, except they cost twice as much, the markers cost five times more than chalk*, and last for one tenth of the time. This is PROGRESS! Stand in it'sway at your peril.

(Also, you throw a marker pen at a recalcitrant student - and you find you're before the beak on an assault charge!)

[/rant]


edit* By which I mean, 1 marker pen costs five times as much as A PACKET of chalk and lasts one tenth of the time of ONE PIECE of chalk!




Yup, we had them when I was teaching: "dry erase boards".
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