Wordsmith.org: the magic of words

Wordsmith Talk

About Us | What's New | Search | Site Map | Contact Us  

Page 2 of 3 < 1 2 3 >
Topic Options
#175361 - 03/31/08 06:30 AM Re: Literal Meaning Vs. Dictionary Definition [Re: zmjezhd]
The Pook Offline
old hand

Registered: 02/20/08
Posts: 1067
Loc: Tasmania
I don't think the OP was suggesting using the word cognates with the students anyway. My point is that the original point is valid no matter what you call them.

Top
#175366 - 03/31/08 09:15 AM Re: Literal Meaning Vs. Dictionary Definition [Re: The Pook]
zmjezhd Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 08/13/05
Posts: 3286
Loc: R'lyeh
My point is that the original point is valid no matter what you call them.

And my point was for him to use a set of terminology to describe these relationships that is consistent with what experts in the field use. I noted: "They are a similar kind of historical development, but not cognates." At this point, I might add morphological between historical and development.
_________________________
Ceci n'est pas un seing.

Top
#175390 - 03/31/08 07:11 PM Re: Literal Meaning Vs. Dictionary Definition [Re: Bigwig Rabbit]
Bigwig Rabbit Offline
newbie

Registered: 11/22/07
Posts: 33
Loc: California, USA
As the OP, I'll say these: first, I have used the word "cognate" sparingly for items such as the prefix "con-" (meaning "with" both morphologically as well as in Spanish). As of yet, I have not run into them so often, or rather, I have not worked out a really good way to address them in a logical manner. In fact, I haven't worked out how to address anything in a logical manner. My curriculum that I am developing is still in an infantile state.

>Likewise, I would use the term etymological meaning, rather than >literal meaning.

How about "essential meaning"? Once I define "essential" I think the kids would have an easier time retaining and relating to the concept. I've been calling it the literal meaning of the word, but I see your point in being more precise in my nomenclature.
_________________________
http://shooper60.googlepages.com/home

Top
#175393 - 03/31/08 08:38 PM Re: Literal Meaning Vs. Dictionary Definition [Re: Bigwig Rabbit]
of troy Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 10/17/00
Posts: 5400
Loc: rego park
you could also have them look for patterns...
like A

some words start with A (amoral, atypical, abyss, )are connected (by A) and other A(l) words (alcohol,) are connected in other ways..
and then there is about.. (is there a word bout? (sure) and what is the function of the A--or is about 'whole' word in its self?)

it can be a lifelong habit of looking at words.. (and while there are always exceptions, learning to 'break apart" (and put together words!) can be fun (and can help when you come to unknown words... an understanding will help make good guesses (and good guess can add points to SAT scores!)
_________________________
my other obsession

Top
#175957 - 04/17/08 01:15 PM Re: Literal Meaning Vs. Dictionary Definition [Re: Bigwig Rabbit]
goofy Offline
member

Registered: 01/06/08
Posts: 132
 Originally Posted By: Bigwig Rabbit
How about "essential meaning"?


I wouldn't use "essential meaning" myself... then you're saying that the essential meaning of "dilapidate" is "stone", which makes no sense. "etymological meaning" is much better.

Top
#175983 - 04/17/08 07:44 PM Re: Literal Meaning Vs. Dictionary Definition [Re: goofy]
The Pook Offline
old hand

Registered: 02/20/08
Posts: 1067
Loc: Tasmania
 Originally Posted By: goofy
 Originally Posted By: Bigwig Rabbit
How about "essential meaning"?


I wouldn't use "essential meaning" myself... then you're saying that the essential meaning of "dilapidate" is "stone", which makes no sense. "etymological meaning" is much better.


How about "component meaning" or "compartmental meaning" or "morph slot" meaning or a similar word that refers to the morphological components of the word?

Top
#175985 - 04/17/08 08:07 PM Re: Literal Meaning Vs. Dictionary Definition [Re: The Pook]
Bigwig Rabbit Offline
newbie

Registered: 11/22/07
Posts: 33
Loc: California, USA
As far as dilapidated meaning "stone", my dissecting of it brings me to "completely throw stones" (French dis + lapidare). This is my core issue with which I'm dealing. For comprehension and vocabulary purposes, I want the kids to be able to come to this etymological meaning and merge it cognitively with the dictionary definition. I want them to begin moving toward doing this automatically when they read or take tests. My idea of calling it the "essential meaning" was to simplify the term, but still be as pedantic as possible. In other words, I'm all for isopaleocopric pedagogy.
_________________________
http://shooper60.googlepages.com/home

Top
#175987 - 04/17/08 08:48 PM Re: Literal Meaning Vs. Dictionary Definition [Re: Bigwig Rabbit]
Faldage Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 12/01/00
Posts: 13783
 Originally Posted By: Bigwig Rabbit
As far as dilapidated meaning "stone", my dissecting of it brings me to "completely throw stones" (French dis + lapidare).


The di- is from the Latin di-, dis-, 'apart'. There's no completely in there.

Top
#175989 - 04/17/08 09:12 PM Re: Literal Meaning Vs. Dictionary Definition [Re: Faldage]
Bigwig Rabbit Offline
newbie

Registered: 11/22/07
Posts: 33
Loc: California, USA
My source for dismeaning "completely" was the Miriam Webster Prefixes and Suffixes reference. (sorry about the superfluous characters!) I'm not arguing that you are wrong, Faldage, I'm just posting my source. If I'm mistaken, you can see why.

dis- prefix 7ME dis-, des-, fr. OF ? L@ OF des-, dis-, fr. L dis-,
lit., apart, to pieces@ akin to OE te- apart, to pieces, OHG zi-,
ze-, Goth dis- apart, Gk dia through, Alb tsh- apart, L duo
two8 1 a : do the opposite of : reverse <a specified action=
9disjoin: 9disestablish: 9disown: 9disqualify: b : deprive of
<a specified character, quality, or rank= 9disable: 9disprince:
: deprive of <a specified object= 9disfrock: c : exclude or
expel from 9disbar: 9discastle: 2 : opposite of : contrary of
: absence of 9disunion: 9disaffection: 3 : not 9dishonest:
9disloyal: 4 : completely 9disannul: 5 7by folk etymology8
: - 9disfunction: 9distrophy:


I
_________________________
http://shooper60.googlepages.com/home

Top
#175993 - 04/17/08 11:42 PM Re: Literal Meaning Vs. Dictionary Definition [Re: Bigwig Rabbit]
The Pook Offline
old hand

Registered: 02/20/08
Posts: 1067
Loc: Tasmania
 Originally Posted By: Bigwig Rabbit
I'm all for isopaleocopric pedagogy.


...which would be different from isopaleocopralitic pedagogy...

Top
Page 2 of 3 < 1 2 3 >


Moderator:  Jackie 
Forum Stats
8687 Members
16 Forums
13783 Topics
213030 Posts

Max Online: 3341 @ 12/09/11 02:15 PM
Newest Members
efghij468263, csmoore, Jane Luckner, anjela, MR LOGOPHILE
8687 Registered Users
Who's Online
0 registered (), 30 Guests and 2 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Top Posters (30 Days)
wofahulicodoc 77
LukeJavan8 63
endymion6 56
jenny jenny 47
Tromboniator 12
Faldage 5
Mercur10 1
Jane Luckner 1
MR LOGOPHILE 1
csmoore 1
April
Su M Tu W Th F Sa
1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30

Disclaimer: Wordsmith.org is not responsible for views expressed on this site. Use of this forum is at your own risk and liability - you agree to hold Wordsmith.org and its associates harmless as a condition of using it.

Home | Today's Word | Yesterday's Word | Subscribe | FAQ | Archives | Search | Feedback
Wordsmith Talk | Wordsmith Chat

© 2014 Wordsmith