Wordsmith.org: the magic of words

Wordsmith Talk

About Us | What's New | Search | Site Map | Contact Us  

Page 5 of 6 < 1 2 3 4 5 6 >
Topic Options
#173941 - 02/22/08 10:33 PM Re: Dramatic silence in music [Re: zmjezhd]
The Pook Offline
old hand

Registered: 02/20/08
Posts: 1067
Loc: Tasmania
Originally Posted By: zmjezhd
The point I was making was that a 'diminutive' denotes not just the affix itself, but the resulting word, which is bigger than the word was before the affix was affixed.

The diminutive refers not to the affix or the word, but usually the referent.


Well, it refers also to the word in one sense, as in the word pookaroonie being a diminutive of the word pook. But the meaning of the word diminutive (in this context) comes from the referent if that's what you mean. It's called a diminutive not because it diminishes the word, but because it diminishes the person the word stands for. A nickname diminishes a person's social standing. It makes them lesser in relation to you.

A diminutive can be formed by changing or subtracting from a word as well by adding an affix. Bill is a diminutive of William. But Billy is a further diminutive of Bill.

I've copied this reply to the new thread, best to continue this interesting discussion there maybe?
http://wordsmith.org/board/ubbthreads.ph...true#Post173918


Edited by The Pook (02/22/08 10:40 PM)

Top
#173943 - 02/22/08 10:38 PM Re: your stirabout is on the hob [Re: The Pook]
zmjezhd Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 08/13/05
Posts: 3290
Loc: R'lyeh
what's a nom-de-ouaibbe?

Bad transcription in vacan French of English web. Avatar, user id or name. That sort of thing.
_________________________
Ceci n'est pas un seing.

Top
#173944 - 02/22/08 10:43 PM Re: Dramatic silence in music [Re: The Pook]
zmjezhd Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 08/13/05
Posts: 3290
Loc: R'lyeh
as in the word pookaroonie being a diminutive of the word pook

I'd read this as pookeroonie is the diminutive form of Pook.

A nickname diminishes a person's social standing. It makes them lesser in relation to you.

I'm sorry you took it that way. As mentioned before, a diminutive is often used as an affectionate hypocoristic form. It increases (or augments) your standing within the social group. Though, I'm sure if you take offense to a nickname, folks here-abouts will cease using it.
_________________________
Ceci n'est pas un seing.

Top
#173945 - 02/22/08 10:59 PM Re: Dramatic silence in music [Re: zmjezhd]
latishya Offline
enthusiast

Registered: 11/24/07
Posts: 390
Loc: कहीं &...
Originally Posted By: zmjezhd
as in the word pookaroonie being a diminutive of the word pook

I'd read this as pookeroonie is the diminutive form of Pook.

A nickname diminishes a person's social standing. It makes them lesser in relation to you.

I'm sorry you took it that way. As mentioned before, a diminutive is often used as an affectionate hypocoristic form. It increases (or augments) your standing within the social group.


Thanks for saying this. It expresses what I was thinking when I read Pook's words.

Top
#173946 - 02/22/08 11:01 PM Re: Dramatic silence in music [Re: zmjezhd]
Jackie Offline

Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 03/15/00
Posts: 11609
Loc: Louisville, Kentucky
a diminutive is often used as an affectionate 'deed. :-)

[complete and total aside: I'm sitting here absolutely jamming to Split Enz' Spellbound. I looked up more of the discography/lyrics today; no wonder I couldn't understand this word: Taniwha!]

Top
#173948 - 02/22/08 11:07 PM Re: Dramatic silence in music [Re: Jackie]
The Pook Offline
old hand

Registered: 02/20/08
Posts: 1067
Loc: Tasmania
Originally Posted By: Jackie
a diminutive is often used as an affectionate 'deed. :-)

[complete and total aside: I'm sitting here absolutely jamming to Split Enz' Spellbound. I looked up more of the discography/lyrics today; no wonder I couldn't understand this word: Taniwha!]


New Zealandish?

Top
#173951 - 02/22/08 11:45 PM Re: Dramatic silence in music [Re: Jackie]
latishya Offline
enthusiast

Registered: 11/24/07
Posts: 390
Loc: कहीं &...
Originally Posted By: Jackie
[color:#6600CC] Taniwha!


In Aotearoa, they even have the power to delay the building of roads.

Top
#173974 - 02/23/08 11:02 AM Re: Dramatic silence in music [Re: latishya]
Jackie Offline

Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 03/15/00
Posts: 11609
Loc: Louisville, Kentucky
New Zealandish? That's them! I went to see Tim Finn in concert last week.

In Aotearoa, they even have the power to delay the building of roads. I read that! I wish now that I'd looked that up before going to the concert: the young man playing guitar with him was at least part Maaori; MAN that kid could riff!

Top
#173998 - 02/24/08 11:39 AM Re: Dramatic silence in music [Re: latishya]
belMarduk Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 09/28/00
Posts: 2891
>>>Affectionate diminutive

Aye, I think most diminutive use is affectionate.

A diminutive used to demean or diminish someone is very evident; there is no misconstruing it.

For example, Fred and William are in an argument that is getting heated. Fred, in an agressive, angry or baiting tone says, "listen up Billy boy" when he would generally refer to William as Bill. In that case, Billy boy is a diminutive.


If you're very sensitive about it Pook, you might want to let us know since the moniker you chose is one that invites cute add-ons and you seemed genial enough, so it is not surprising that folks would greet you affectionately.

Also, throwing out a challenge as to discovering the provenence of the name seemed playful, and an invitation to cameraderie. Again, if we were mistaken, then it would be good to know.


Edited by belMarduk (02/24/08 11:42 AM)

Top
#174008 - 02/24/08 05:52 PM Re: Dramatic silence in music [Re: belMarduk]
The Pook Offline
old hand

Registered: 02/20/08
Posts: 1067
Loc: Tasmania
1. No I'm not sensitive. It is after all, not my name, but just a handle, and yes it was a playful gesture.
2. You misunderstood what I said about diminutives applying to the referent by diminishing them socially. That's not the same as demeaning someone. Even an affectionate nickname reduces, minimises, the social distance between you and the one the diminutive is applied to. It puts them on the same level as you. Whether this is rude or not depends on the ACTUAL relationship between the people. If you were to go up to the President of the USA (assuming you are not known to him) and say "Hey Georgie baby!" it probably would be taken as inappropriate.

But let me make it quite clear - you may desecrate my handle in any way you wish and it won't upset me.

Top
Page 5 of 6 < 1 2 3 4 5 6 >

Moderator:  Jackie 
Forum Stats
8738 Members
16 Forums
13806 Topics
215122 Posts

Max Online: 3341 @ 12/09/11 02:15 PM
Newest Members
KatieC, ashishsum, ackcat, mayne, Yesurbius
8738 Registered Users
Who's Online
0 registered (), 16 Guests and 4 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Top Posters (30 Days)
LukeJavan8 91
endymion6 86
wofahulicodoc 76
A C Bowden 41
Tromboniator 5
May 4
FoFong 3
LadyReader 2
tsuwm 1
KatieC 1
Top Posters
wwh 13858
Faldage 13803
Jackie 11609
tsuwm 10522
Buffalo Shrdlu 7210
AnnaStrophic 6511
LukeJavan8 6486
Wordwind 6296
of troy 5400
BranShea 5282

Disclaimer: Wordsmith.org is not responsible for views expressed on this site. Use of this forum is at your own risk and liability - you agree to hold Wordsmith.org and its associates harmless as a condition of using it.

Home | Today's Word | Yesterday's Word | Subscribe | FAQ | Archives | Search | Feedback
Wordsmith Talk | Wordsmith Chat

© 2014 Wordsmith