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#173968 - 02/23/08 09:57 AM Re: "Wry and/or Dry "sense of humor" [Re: The Pook]
AnnaStrophic Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 03/15/00
Posts: 6511
Loc: lower upstate New York
>It is a cat's humour rather than a dog's humour.

I love this. May I borrow it?

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#173981 - 02/23/08 11:58 PM Re: "Wry and/or Dry "sense of humor" [Re: AnnaStrophic]
The Pook Offline
old hand

Registered: 02/20/08
Posts: 1067
Loc: Tasmania
Originally Posted By: AnnaStrophic
>It is a cat's humour rather than a dog's humour.

I love this. May I borrow it?


You mean you'll give it back when you're finished? Of course you may. As far as I know I made that one up. A one-liner I didn't make up that I love is "so funny it'd make a cat laugh."

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#173989 - 02/24/08 08:08 AM Re: "Wry and/or Dry "sense of humor" [Re: The Pook]
Faldage Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 12/01/00
Posts: 13803
An example of dry humor might be in order. In his otherwise unhumorous book The Dictionary of Misinformation Tom Burnam says of the habit of the English of drinking warm beer:

Quote:
It is often said that the English like to serve and drink their beer warm. This is not exactly true; commonly, beer is served in England at room temperature. No one who has spent much time in England is likely to confuse this with "warm."

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#174009 - 02/24/08 05:55 PM Re: "Wry and/or Dry "sense of humor" [Re: Faldage]
The Pook Offline
old hand

Registered: 02/20/08
Posts: 1067
Loc: Tasmania
Originally Posted By: Faldage
An example of dry humor might be in order. In his otherwise unhumorous book The Dictionary of Misinformation Tom Burnam says of the habit of the English of drinking warm beer:

Quote:
It is often said that the English like to serve and drink their beer warm. This is not exactly true; commonly, beer is served in England at room temperature. No one who has spent much time in England is likely to confuse this with "warm."


...on the other hand, most English Pubs seem to be full of hot sweaty English bodies crammed in round a roaring fire!

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#174539 - 03/11/08 09:14 PM Re: "Wry and/or Dry "sense of humor" [Re: The Pook]
twosleepy Offline
old hand

Registered: 02/28/08
Posts: 876
Loc: western NY
When I think "dry humor", I think mostly of the delivery. Dry humor is definitely intended and deliberately delivered, but without any hint of amusement on the part of the deliverer. Whenever I see episodes from "All Creatures Great and Small" (one of the many BBC program(me)s that I love!), I thoroughly enjoy the multiple displays of dry humor in this superbly written and acted series.

On the other hand, to me "wry humor" is delivered with, at the very least, a twinkle in the eye, and possibly a nascent smile, and maybe even a wink, as the deliverer is thoroughly enjoying his/her own humor. It must also, in my mind, be witty and creative, so as to rustle the hair of some listeners, as they may notice its passing, but not quite understand what just whizzed by over their heads... :0)

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