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#14642 - 01/05/01 02:58 PM Re: What do you call someone who...
Chickie Offline
newbie

Registered: 01/05/01
Posts: 35
Grinning!


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#14643 - 01/05/01 02:58 PM Re: What do you call someone who...
nemo Offline
newbie

Registered: 12/22/00
Posts: 46
Loc: Tol EressŽa
In reply to:

The survey at http://www.speakout.com/VoteMatch calls me a moderate conservative.


Isn't that an oxymoron?


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#14644 - 01/05/01 03:13 PM Re: What do you call someone who...
Max Quordlepleen Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 08/12/00
Posts: 3409
Jazz enlightened me with this: And by the way Max, I wouldn't consider myself a staunch republican. The survey at http://www.speakout.com/VoteMatch calls me a moderate conservative. There are some republican ideas with which I don't agree, but when it comes to arguing, I go with the GOP. Plus, the way Al Gore makes a speech makes me sick.

Fairy nuff, I sit corrected. I'm not sure it's right to speak so disrespeckfly 'bout the father of this here electrical Internet thingumabob, but!



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#14645 - 01/05/01 03:33 PM Re: What do you call someone who...
Jazzoctopus Offline
old hand

Registered: 07/03/00
Posts: 1094
Loc: Cincinnati & Loveland, Ohio, U...
The survey at http://www.speakout.com/VoteMatch calls me a moderate conservative.

Isn't that an oxymoron?


Well, since you think it is, could you please tell us all why exactly it is an oxymoron? If this is an oxymoron, then we have to be fair and say that moderate liberal is as well.

I see it as perfectly plausible for someone to agree with most, but not all, of a certain party's beliefs.

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#14646 - 01/05/01 03:51 PM Re: What do you call someone who...
Solamente, Doug. Offline
member

Registered: 12/16/00
Posts: 130
Loc: Virginia
My mom, a former RN at a nursing home, used to speak of "empathy fatigue". After working all day dealing with other people's complaints she would find it difficult to empathize with her own families' problems. God bless her, we empathized and forgave her.


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#14647 - 01/05/01 04:02 PM Re: What do you call someone who...
Capital Kiwi Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 11/13/00
Posts: 3146
Loc: Northamptonshire, England
Half the nounal-adjective/noun combinations used in the English language could be called oxymorons. My personal favourite is "military intelligence". As an oxymoron it's right up there with the ultimate circumlocution, reputedly from the CIA, which defines "peace" as "permanent prehostility".

Let's not start arguing over the possible combinations of nouns which produce possible oxymorons - especially politically-related ones such as that one-word oxymoron, "politic" ... that way lieth madness

_________________________
The idiot also known as Capfka ...

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#14648 - 01/05/01 04:32 PM Re: What do you call someone who...
Max Quordlepleen Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 08/12/00
Posts: 3409
The very un-delooped CapKiwi sagely suggested: Let's not start arguing over the possible combinations of nouns which produce possible oxymorons - especially politically-related ones such as that one-word oxymoron, "politic"

Agreed! Avoiding politics seems a politic course of action. Jazz, you are the one who has expressed your politicak opinions most forthrightly to date, and I think that you are to be commended for the restraint you have shown in this thread. I suspect that our little Miss nobody just likes to needle people a bit, from behind the sanctuary of her anonymity. Given that we have atheists and at least one cleric (of course, one can be both simultaneously) sharing this board very amicably, I'm sure that we can continue the tradition of leaving such matters as politics and religion where they belong - not here.


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#14649 - 01/05/01 04:50 PM Re: politics and religion
AnnaStrophic Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 03/15/00
Posts: 6511
Loc: lower upstate New York
... for all we know, could be a little Mister nobody ['delicate cough' emoticon]. But yer point is taken and seconded, Max. ['hear, hear' emoticon]


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#14650 - 01/05/01 05:04 PM Re: There's a place for this
bear-tiger Offline
stranger

Registered: 01/05/01
Posts: 2
Okay, then. How about empath-path?--as an analogue to psychopath, sociopath....



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#14651 - 01/05/01 05:25 PM Re: There's a place for this
belMarduk Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 09/28/00
Posts: 2891
Oh, I think bear-tiger has it. I recall the word sociopath being used to describe a young boy who showed no empathy towards anybody and was only concerned with the things that affected him. He did not understand, say, why it was bad to hurt someone.


Hello bear-tiger and chickie ... welcome on Board.


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