Wordsmith.org: the magic of words

Wordsmith Talk

About Us | What's New | Search | Site Map | Contact Us  

Page 3 of 3 < 1 2 3
Topic Options
#103814 - 10/06/03 05:54 AM Re: tehi teru toru
Capfka Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 06/28/02
Posts: 1624
Loc: Utter Placebo, Planet Reebok
Yeah, but I was thinking more which of your whanau should also be your kai tangata ...


Top
#103815 - 01/25/04 01:54 PM Re: A geographical curiosity
sjmaxq Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 07/20/03
Posts: 3230
Loc: Te Ika a Maui
I'm bringing this back up because of a fascinating link on Uncle jazzbeau's page - http://www.dialettando.com/dizionario - a dictionary of Italian dialects. Perusing the word list for the dialect of Emilia Romagna, the region of Italy surroudning San Marino, I found many more examples of this French influence, some that were strikingly obvious, such as "pomm-da-téra" for "patata". Below are are a few more Romagnola words that caught my eye for their similarities to various languages, including, in the case of the first two, English.

bütér : burro
dé : giorno
muiér : moglie
narans: arancia

_________________________
noho ora mai
http://maxqnzs.com/References.html

Top
#103816 - 01/25/04 04:09 PM Re: A geographical curiosity
jheem Offline
veteran

Registered: 01/06/04
Posts: 1474
Loc: California
The dialects of northern Italy, especially Piedmontese, Ligurian, Lombardian, Emilian, and Venetian belong to a group of Italian dialects called Gallo-Italian, and share features with French (especially Provencal) as well as other Italian dialects. (My grandmother spoke Genoese, one of the Ligurian dialects. Its inventory of vowels is closer to French than to standard Italian, including front and mid rounded vowels.) Standard Italian (developed in the main from Tuscan) is outside of this northern group of dialects.


Top
#103817 - 01/25/04 04:31 PM Re: A geographical curiosity
sjmaxq Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 07/20/03
Posts: 3230
Loc: Te Ika a Maui
I know that one ought not make too much of isolated examples, but I wonder, zio, if you know how emilian ended up with "dé" for "day" and "buter" for "butter"? There are one or two words I could add to that list of emilian words. A friend from Rimini says that his mother always says "madosca" for "madonna", and sammarinese uses "arlog" (sp?) for "orologio".

_________________________
noho ora mai
http://maxqnzs.com/References.html

Top
#103818 - 01/25/04 09:19 PM Re: A geographical curiosity
jheem Offline
veteran

Registered: 01/06/04
Posts: 1474
Loc: California
how emilian ended up with "dé" for "day"

Well, the Latin word for day is dies. And Italian does have from this word. But it's not the regular word for day, which is giorno from Latin diurnum. The thing to remember about dialects is that they are just as old as standard languages. In this case that means that emiliano has been around as long as tuscano, but just that it lost out in the political contest that that establishes standard languages.

"buter" for "butter"?

Well, Italian burro, like emiliano büter and buter are both from Greek boutyron 'butter', the two words just developed differently. Italian also has butirro which is a more learned word.

The famous French linguist Gillieron said that "each word has its own hisotry."

A friend from Rimini says that his mother always says "madosca" for "madonna"

This seems strange, but I wouldn't say it's impossible.

sammarinese uses "arlog" (sp?) for "orologio".

That doesn't seem too different. Remember, as Max Weinreich once said: "a language is a dialect with an army and a navy."




Top
Page 3 of 3 < 1 2 3

Moderator:  Jackie 
Forum Stats
8740 Members
16 Forums
13807 Topics
215227 Posts

Max Online: 3341 @ 12/09/11 02:15 PM
Newest Members
auster, ozyildirimeda, KatieC, ashishsum, ackcat
8740 Registered Users
Who's Online
0 registered (), 33 Guests and 5 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Top Posters (30 Days)
endymion6 85
LukeJavan8 74
wofahulicodoc 63
A C Bowden 34
May 4
FoFong 3
Tromboniator 3
LadyReader 2
TitoMatito 2
tsuwm 2
Top Posters
wwh 13858
Faldage 13803
Jackie 11609
tsuwm 10523
Buffalo Shrdlu 7210
LukeJavan8 6513
AnnaStrophic 6511
Wordwind 6296
of troy 5400
BranShea 5282

Disclaimer: Wordsmith.org is not responsible for views expressed on this site. Use of this forum is at your own risk and liability - you agree to hold Wordsmith.org and its associates harmless as a condition of using it.

Home | Today's Word | Yesterday's Word | Subscribe | FAQ | Archives | Search | Feedback
Wordsmith Talk | Wordsmith Chat

© 2014 Wordsmith